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I love this area of Brighton & Hove!

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Kemptown is one of the districts in the city of Brighton & Hove.

In the 1960s, I lived there for a while and occasionally I revisit this area. It is that part of Brighton lying to the east of the Palace Pier and the Royal Pavilion and to the west of Black Rock and Brighton Marina. It is a very cosmopolitan area – historically it was known as an actors’ and artists’ quarter, but it also has a sizeable gay community.
There are a number of specialised shops, hotels, cafés and pubs in Kemptown. The area is well-served by public transport and Volk’s Railway runs between the Pier and Black Rock.
Kemptown has had many notable residents including Sir Lawrence Olivier, Vita Sackville West, Lewis Carroll (Revd Charles Dodgson) , Anna Neagle, Max Miller and Flora Robson.
Kemptown seafront is a particularly pleasant place to walk – there are three routes! Madeira Drive is the road on the seaward side; Madeira Terrace is a Victorian-built walkway built halfway up the cliff and Marine Parade is the main A259 road. St James’ Street is the main shopping thoroughfare with many cafes, bars, restaurants and shops.
I love this area of Brighton & Hove!
Last visit was in September 2016. 
Kemptown seafront © Robert Bovington
Volk’s Railway © Robert Bovington
The Arches Kemptown Brighton © Robert Bovington

other blogs by Robert Bovington:

“Photographs of Spain”
“Spanish Impressions”
“postcards from Spain”
“you couldn’t make it up!”
“a grumpy old man in Spain”
“Spanish Expressions”
“Spanish Art”
“Books About Spain”
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Brighton & Hove in photographs

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Brighton Wheel
Brighton Royal Pavilion
Hove seafront

for more photos of Brighton and Hove – click on link below…

 

Brighton & Hove – Robert Bovington – Picasa Web Albums:

‘via Blog this’

Three Kings Day 2014

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Today, is Three Kings Day in Spain (and other places around the World). It celebrates the day on which the Three Wise Men arrived in Bethlehem bringing gifts for baby Jesus.

Whilst the UK suffers extreme weather conditions, we in Roquetas de Mar have enjoyed a lovely warm sunny day.

This morning, my wife and I went for a walk along Aguadulce seafront and we then had breakfast alfresco at La Boheme restaurant.

Later, we enjoyed a marvellous concert on channel TVE2. It featured ballet and opera from the New Mariinsky Theatre in St Petersburg. Placido Domingo, Anna Netrekbo and Olga Borodina were just some of the artists featured. Valery Gergiev conducted the orchestra.

It was still warm and sunny in the afternoon so lunch was spent on the balcony of our apartment in Roquetas de Mar.

other blogs by Robert Bovington:

“Photographs of Spain”
“Spanish Impressions”
“postcards from Spain”
“you couldn’t make it up!”
“a grumpy old man in Spain”
“Spanish Expressions”
“Spanish Art”
“Books About Spain”

Brighton & Hove ‘birdcage’ Bandstand

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The magnificent structure known as the ‘birdcage’ Bandstand is a Grade II listed building of architectural and historical importance. It stands prominent on Brighton’s seafront and commands excellent views of the coast. It was designed by Phillip Lockwood and completed in 1884.
Brighton ‘Birdcage’ Bandstand – photo © Robert Bovington

 

Below is a painting by my brother William of Brighton & Hove seafront that includes the ‘Birdcage’ Bandstand.

 

Eve before the Storm’ by Lorus Maver (William Bovington)

 

more paintings by William Bovington: 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lorus_maver


other blogs by Robert Bovington: 

“Photographs of Spain”
“Spanish Impressions”
“postcards from Spain”
“you couldn’t make it up!”
“a grumpy old man in Spain”
“Spanish Expressions”
“Spanish Art”
“Books About Spain”

House for sale in the beautiful Alpujarras

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House in Ugíjar (Granada)  64,500 €

House in Ugíjar (Granada)
64,500 €

Familiar Spanish Travels (book review)

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Familiar Spanish Travels by William Dean Howells
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

“Familiar Spanish Travels” by William Dean Howells
A review by Robert Bovington

In October 1911, American William Dean Howells travelled to Spain. The author wrote about his experiences in “Familiar Spanish Travels”.
As an avid reader of books about Spain, I have mixed feelings about this book. Certainly, I did not enjoy it as much as other books that I have read on the subject. I found Howells’ literary style too verbose. I wonder whether the author thought: “Why use two or three pithy adjectives when two or three pages of text will do the same job!”
He describes with great detail the strangers that he encounters on his travels, yet often provides little detail on the principal sights. Many of Howells’ sentences are inordinately long – 40, 50 words or more! Yet, despite his longwinded descriptions, Howells manages to convey his thoughts to the reader in both a poetic and an extremely descriptive manner. The reader can easily imagine the bleakness of the Meseta and the “insurpassably dirty and dangerous” gipsy quarters of Granada and Seville. Howells certainly was not, what we today call, politically correct. He frequently describes some of the Spanish women as fat. Nor did the author view his surroundings with rose tinted spectacles. He mentions bad breakfasts; freezing hotels, cold rainy streets and “the thick and noisome stench” of Cervantes former home in Valladolid. But he waxed lyrical about a great deal of his experiences too: the incomparable grandeur of Burgos Cathedral; the glorious masterpiece that is Murillo’s “Vision of St Anthony”; the unparalleled beauty of the Alhambra and the magnificent structure that is the Puente Nuevo in Ronda are shortened versions of just some of his descriptions.
I know people’s tastes are different but what really surprised me was the author’s likes and dislikes regarding the places he visited. He did not like Córdoba but, to be fair, it was raining during his visit and he described the houses as “wet and chill”. However, he was also disappointed in that city’s beautiful Mezquita. Yet he really liked Algeciras! Certainly, from the author’s text, I gathered that he preferred ‘people watching’ to visiting the famous sights, which probably explains the imbalance between his descriptions of people and his accounts of the places visited. But, then, the whole expedition was unbalanced. He spent only half an hour in Toledo’s magnificent Cathedral and not much longer in the Mezquita, yet he visited Seville Cathedral every day during his fortnight’s stay! He appears to have enjoyed Madrid, especially the Prado and he was greatly taken with Granada though, more for the views from within and without the Alhambra than for the wonderful Arabic architecture. He preferred the Palace of Charles V to the Nasrid Palaces in that magnificent monument to the Moors rule in Spain.
Notwithstanding the author’s idiosyncrasies, “Familiar Spanish Travels” will probably be an enjoyable read for those readers who wish to partake of a “warts and all” commentary of life in early 2oth century Spain.

Robert Bovington
April 2011

View all my reviews

“Photographs of Spain”
“Spanish Impressions”
“postcards from Spain”
“you couldn’t make it up!”
“a grumpy old man in Spain”
“Spanish Expressions”
“Spanish Art”
“Books About Spain”

A walk in the South Downs National Park

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On Bank Holiday Monday (26 Aug 2013), I went for an enjoyable walk with my brother Mike.

We walked across part of the Sussex Downs

We started from the ‘Smugglers Rest’ pub/restaurant in Telscombe, Peacehaven, East Sussex. On my previous visits, some years ago, it was known as the ‘Badgers Watch’.

From there, we journeyed over part of the Sussex Downs, starting from Telscombe Tye, an area of common land between the coast and Telscombe Village.


Telscombe Village Church

We walked through green and pleasant countryside…

through farmland…

and arrived at the ‘Abergavenny Arms’ in Rodmell…

We had a couple of pints in the attractive beer garden before restarting our walk back to Telscombe.

NOTE:
About 500 yards down the lane at the side of the pub. is Monk’s House, the home of the author Virginia Woolf for twenty-one years until her death in 1941. When I lived in the UK, I was a member of the National Trust and visited the little cottage on two occasions.

more photos of our walk…

One of the signposts on the walk was marked “To the Pub”!

We ended our walk with a pint at the ‘Smugglers Rest’…


other blogs by Robert Bovington:

“Photographs of Spain”
“Spanish Impressions”
“postcards from Spain”
“you couldn’t make it up!”
“a grumpy old man in Spain”
“Spanish Expressions”
“Spanish Art”
“Books About Spain”

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